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Senate confirms Anna Gomez to FCC

The U.S. Senate on Thursday voted to confirm former telecommunications attorney Anna Gomez to fill a long-standing vacancy at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

The move was praised by public interest groups and private firms alike, who noted Gomez’s extensive experience working in the technology and communications sector, as well as her leadership at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA).

“The extensive experience and expertise Anna Gomez will bring to the FCC is of great value during a time of intense industry competition and change,” Tom Reid, the chief legal officer at Comcast, said in a statement following the confirmation vote. “In both the public and private sectors, Ms. Gomez has exhibited great depth on the vital communications issues facing the country. We congratulate her on joining the FCC, and we look forward to working with her and the full complement of commissioner.”

Separately, the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) also congratulated Gomez for securing a spot at the FCC.

“NAB looks forward to working with Ms. Gomez and a fully seated Commission to provide the regulatory certainty, modernization and flexibility that will enable local broadcasting to thrive and enhance our service to tens of millions of American every day,” Chris LeGeyt, the CEO of NAB, said on Thursday.

Gomez was the second official nominated by President Biden to fill the vacancy at the agency. His first nominee, Gigi Sohn, withdrew from consideration following a contentious Senate confirmation hearing earlier this year.

Not everyone was thrilled with Gomez’s nomination to the FCC. During a comment period, Florida Senator Ted Cruz said he opposed her nomination to the agency, suggesting it would “give the democrats a majority at the FCC that would enable them to impose a radical, left-wing agenda, including investment-killing and job-killing so-called net neutrality rules.”

Gomez previously worked at the FCC in various roles, to include serving as a senior legal advisor to the agency’s former chairman, William Kennard. Her term is set for five years, though the start date goes back to July 2021.

The final Senate vote was 55-43.

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About the Author:

Matthew Keys

Matthew Keys is the publisher of The Desk and reports on the business and policy matters involving the broadcast television, streaming video and radio industries. He previously worked for Thomson Reuters, Disney-ABC, Tribune Broadcasting and McNaughton Newspapers. Matthew is based in Northern California, has won numerous awards in the field of journalism, and is a member of IRE (Investigative Reporters and Editors).