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Brits experiencing more ads on streaming services, survey reveals

Around 49 percent of streamers surveyed by Dynata said they viewed more ads on streaming services this year compared to 2022.

Around 49 percent of streamers surveyed by Dynata said they viewed more ads on streaming services this year compared to 2022.

The Disney Plus streaming app on a smartphone. (Photo by Mika Baumeister via Unsplash)
The Disney Plus streaming app on a smartphone. (Photo by Mika Baumeister via Unsplash)

British streamers say they feel there are more ads on video on-demand services this year compared to 2022, according to the findings of a new survey released this week.

The survey, called “The New Streamer” and conducted by Dyanta under commission from Amdocs, found 49 percent of streamers reported seeing more ad-based video content over the past 12 months.

Around 38 percent of British streamers say they’re opposed to seeing more ads on video services, though a near-even 37 percent said they are open to more ads if it means lower prices or free content.

When asked if price factors into whether a British customer remains loyal to any particular service, just 22 percent of streamers said it did, the survey found.

Instead, streamers in Britain say new and original content is top of mind, with 70 percent saying they prefer original content on a streaming service and 56 percent saying they want content refreshed on a weekly basis.

Just 48 percent said they wanted to watch older content on streaming services, and 42 percent said it was important that they have access to content across platforms and devices when they pay for a service.

Nearly one out of five streaming users in the UK said they feel overwhelmed by the sheer number of linear and video on-demand products on the marketplace, with Millennial consumers feeling the most-overwhelmed by streaming services, the report found.

And an overwhelming number of British streamers surveyed — 78 percent — said they preferred to have a single app or platform where they could access the content they wanted to watch, rather than having to pay for services separately and search for content across apps.

That could be good news to companies like YouTube and Amazon, which have started rolling out European versions of their streaming marketplaces over the past few months.

“Customer expectations for entertainment breadth and quality continue to grow, but needs are increasingly nuanced,” Anthony Goonetilleke, the group president and head of strategy at Amdocs, said in a statement. “Customers are looking for increasing control over their entertainment experience, and at the same time, ready for content innovation that next generation connectivity, coupled with AI, may enable.”

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About the Author:

Matthew Keys

Matthew Keys is the publisher of The Desk and reports on the business and policy matters involving the broadcast television, streaming video and radio industries. He previously worked for Thomson Reuters, Disney-ABC, Tribune Broadcasting and McNaughton Newspapers. Matthew is based in Northern California, has won numerous awards in the field of journalism, and is a member of IRE (Investigative Reporters and Editors).