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Law & Crime Network, Court TV to televise Alec Baldwin trial

The legal affairs networks will offer gavel-to-gavel coverage of the trial, which involves an involuntary manslaughter charge against the actor.

The legal affairs networks will offer gavel-to-gavel coverage of the trial, which involves an involuntary manslaughter charge against the actor.

Alec Baldwin is interviewed by a police officer on the set of "Rust" in 2021.
Alec Baldwin is interviewed by a police officer on the set of “Rust” in 2021. (Graphic by The Desk)

Two television networks have confirmed plans to carry live coverage of Alec Baldwin’s criminal case in New Mexico on Tuesday when the actor goes to trial on a charge of involuntary manslaughter connected to an on-set shooting three years ago.

The networks — Law & Crime and Court TV — will offer wall-to-wall coverage of the trial from Santa Fe, which could last several weeks.

Court TV will provide the pool camera feeds from inside the courtroom, which other broadcasters will be allowed to use. The E. W. Scripps-owned network is available on broadcast television stations in some parts of the country and free, ad-supported streaming TV (FAST) platforms like Fox Corporation’s Tubi and Comcast’s Xumo Play. Specific coverage plans for Court TV were not immediately available, as the network does not send press releases or announcements to The Desk.

Law & Crime is providing robust coverage of the Baldwin trial, starting on Tuesday, which will stream for free via its YouTube channel. Coverage will also stream for free on a number of FAST platforms, including The Roku Channel, Local Now, LG Channels, Samsung TV Plus, Xumo Play, FreeCast and Plex. Some pay TV providers also include access to Law & Crime, including Philo, Fubo, Sling TV, YouTube TV, Comcast’s Xfinity TV, Dish Network and Verizon, and a version of the channel is available on Peacock.

While filming in the desert of New Mexico, Baldwin handled a prop gun that was loaded with live ammunition. A round struck cinematographer Halyna Hutchins, killing her. Baldwin has maintained his innocence, saying he didn’t know the gun was loaded with live bullets and that he never intended to fatally shot Hutchins. Prop coordinator and on-set armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed was also charged in connection with the fatal shooting, and was sentenced to 18 months in prison in April.

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About the Author:

Matthew Keys

Matthew Keys is a nationally-recognized, award-winning journalist who has covered the business of media, technology, radio and television for more than 11 years. He is the publisher of The Desk and contributes to Know Techie, Digital Content Next and StreamTV Insider. He previously worked for Thomson Reuters, the Walt Disney Company, McNaughton Newspapers and Tribune Broadcasting.

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