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Twitter bug impacts hyperlinks, TweetDeck product

A sign attached to Twitter's global headquarters is viewed from a sidewalk on Market Street in San Francisco, California. June 18, 2014. (Photo: Matthew Keys/The Desk/Creative Commons)
A sign attached to Twitter’s global headquarters is viewed from a sidewalk on Market Street in San Francisco, California. June 18, 2014. (Photo: Matthew Keys/The Desk/Creative Commons)

Another day, another widespread Twitter bug.

On Monday, an update to Twitter’s application programming interface (API) resulted in a glitch that left users unable to link to news articles, YouTube videos and other external websites. The bug appeared to impact Twitter’s own link shortening service, t-co, with an error message saying the feature was “not part of your API plan.”

Twitter recently refreshed its API that essentially forces third-party developers to pay for access to its software development kit, which is needed to replicate Twitter features like sending tweets or following users in external applications.

The issue is also impacting the power user product TweetDeck, with users getting the same error message.

It was not clear if Twitter was actively working on the issue. The website’s communications team was laid off last year, and messages sent to an e-mail address used by reporters have not been returned for months.

It was the latest bug to impact the social media website since tech mogul Elon Musk acquired it as part of a multi-billion dollar acquisition in late October. Since then, Twitter has been afflicted by a number of issues, including one that locked out users who had two-factor authentication active on their accounts (Musk has since floated the idea of charging for two-factor authentication, a security feature that most companies offer for free).

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About the Author:

Matthew Keys

Matthew Keys is the publisher of The Desk and reports on the business and policy matters involving the broadcast television, streaming video and radio industries. He previously worked for Thomson Reuters, Disney-ABC, Tribune Broadcasting and McNaughton Newspapers. Matthew is based in Northern California, has won numerous awards in the field of journalism, and is a member of IRE (Investigative Reporters and Editors).