Woman says she voted for Bernie Sanders after unfair media coverage

A New Hampshire woman told MSNBC reporter Ari Melber she cast a vote for Bernie Sanders in the state’s Democratic primary election after watching unfair media coverage of the candidate on the Comcast-owned news network.

During the network’s coverage of political events in New Hampshire on Tuesday, MSNBC host Ari Melber asked an assembled panel of voters who they cast their ballots for in the New Hampshire primary election.

One woman said she was initially undecided because there were “a number of candidates I really like,” but ultimately cast a vote in favor of Sanders.

“Now that’s sort of a paradox, to decide and then feel undecided — so you’re sort of a complex person,” Melber said.

Insulted by Melber’s comment, the woman followed up her remarks by saying it was MSNBC’s unfair coverage of Sanders as a candidate that helped her decide.

“I want to say that the reason I went for Bernie is because of MSNBC,” the woman said.

She cast herself as a loyal MSNBC viewer and said she was upset by the “Stop Bernie” rhetoric she heard from numerous commentators on the network.

“I watch MSNBC constantly, so I heard that from a number of commentators, and so it made me angry enough I said ‘Okay, Bernie’s got my vote,'” she said.

MSNBC commentators and hosts have been critical of the candidate in recent weeks, with Hardball host Chris Matthews comparing Sanders to former Cuban leader Fidel Castro.

MSNBC contributor Jame Carville, a former campaign strategist for President Bill Clinton, said it would be the “end of days” if Sanders received the Democratic nomination and ran against expected incumbent Donald Trump.

“Party. We’re going to be out in some field, radical left-wing la-la land,” Carville said.

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